How can an energy consultancy company help keep our oceans clean?

Optimised Energy is an award-winning energy services business. Its Blackpool HQ is just a few hundred metres from the beach, which makes coastal pollution a very personal, all too visible issue for the team.

Members of Optimised Energy’s Blackpool office recently joined forces with LOVEmyBEACH to take part in a beach clean along Blackpool’s sandy shoreline. The volunteers set out across the six-mile stretch, collecting bottles, cans, plastic wrappers and more. The beach clean collected 10kg of waste, 10kg that would otherwise have found its way into (or back into) the Irish Sea.

LOVEmyBEACH

The LOVEmyBEACH campaign was created in 2013 by Keep Britain Tidy. The campaign works with individuals and partner organisations across the North-West to help keep local beaches and bathing waters clean and free from pollution.

The Scale of Coastal Waste

Since 1994, the waste on England’s beaches has increased threefold, but beach cleans do appear to be having a significant effect. From a peak in 2014 when more than 950 items were found per 100m, in 2019 that figure had fallen to just over 600 items. Overall, the UK picture was 7% better in 2019 than in 2018. Plastic and polystyrene remain the most commonly found items, found three times as frequently as the next most common item (cigarette stubs).

A Simple Difference

Senior Energy Analyst Kirsty Bullough, one of Optimised Energy’s volunteers, said: “It was great that we were able to do something relatively simple that would make an immediate difference to our local environment. The wellbeing factor of being active, doing something for the community and working together on something that was a bit different made it an enjoyable morning.”

This story shows how Optimised Energy supports Goal 14: Life Below Water, specifically Target 14.1: “By 2025, prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution.”

About Optimised Energy

Optimised Energy is a full-service energy consulting business. They deliver energy cost and kilowatt hour savings for their clients through a ‘Managed Energy Services’ approach that combines best-of-breed hardware, software and service.

Learn more about Optimised Energy.

Optimised Energy, the award-winning energy services business, is supporting Samaritans in its work to help people facing challenging times.

Although UK-wide, Samaritans has local branches that help local people in times of crisis. Optimised Energy is supporting Blackpool Fylde and Wyre Samaritans’ ‘Pay for a Day’ appeal by contributing towards daily operating costs, including ongoing training of volunteers and the provision of the free call service.

Facing Crisis Together

In 2018, there were 6,507 suicides registered in the UK. Without Samaritans, the likelihood is that figure would be considerably higher. Every six seconds, Samaritans volunteers answer a call for help. They help people who need someone to listen to them, without pressure or judgement. They work to ensure that fewer people die from suicide.

Supporting Our Community

Suicide rates in Blackpool are higher than the national average. The local Samaritans branch answers around 70 phone calls every day. In addition, it handles 5 emails and 6 texts from users, as well as being there for anyone who chooses to visit for a face to face. So supporting Pay for a Day makes a vital difference on Optimised Energy’s doorstep.

Angie Pascoe, Director for the Blackpool, Fylde, and Wyre Samaritans said: “We are extremely grateful to Optimised Energy for supporting our ‘Pay for a Day’ appeal. This sponsorship is vital for us to continue to have a Samaritan available for callers, whenever they need it and also contributes to initial and on-going training for our volunteers”.

This story shows how Optimised Energy supports Goal 3: Good Health and Well-Being, specifically Target 3.4: “By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being.”

About Optimised Energy

Optimised Energy is a full-service energy consulting business. They deliver energy cost and kilowatt hour savings for their clients through a ‘Managed Energy Services’ approach that combines best-of-breed hardware, software and service.

Learn more about Optimised Energy.

Optimised Energy, the award-winning energy services business, is working to cut waste, reduce carbon and take pressure off the world’s sources of virgin timber by changing the way it uses paper.

Paper Cuts

Optimised Energy calculated that between October 2018 and September 2019 it used 13,000 sheets of paper. With an aim of reducing usage by 10% each year, the company has adopted strategies small and large to achieve its reduction targets:

Paper Trail

It’s easy to think of reducing paper consumption as a low impact exercise, but it plays a vital part in protecting natural resources and reducing carbon emissions. A 2013 European Environmental Paper Network report found “that paper has a very significant impact on the climate and that its ‘vapour trail’ accounts for the equivalent of more than 7% of global GHG emissions, which is higher than aviation emissions.”

Waste Not, Want Not

Optimised Energy’s paper reductions are part of a much broader range of waste management actions. The business is now recording the amount of waste it produces and splitting the data across four waste streams: confidential, mixed recycling, food and general waste. The company is then using the data to take further actions. The food waste from Optimised Energy’s Bristol office, for example, is being collected by GENeco, a local sustainable waste business, which uses a biomethane-powered waste collection vehicle to collect food waste from across the Bristol region which it then delivers for processing into biomethane and biofertilizer.

This story shows how Optimised Energy supports Goal 12: Responsible Consumption and Production, specifically Target 12.5: “By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse.”

About Optimised Energy

Optimised Energy is a full-service energy consulting business. They deliver energy cost and kilowatt hour savings for their clients through a ‘Managed Energy Services’ approach that combines best-of-breed hardware, software and service.

Learn more about Optimised Energy.

Optimised Energy, the award-winning energy services business, is helping to fight food poverty in the community close to its Bristol office.

Once each month, Optimised Energy’s Head of Operations, Roy Bidder, volunteers for FoodCycle, managing a team of cycle volunteers to help collect surplus food from supermarkets and greengrocers around Bristol for community meal projects.

What is Food Poverty?

According to Sustain, the alliance for better food and farming, “Food poverty is the inability to obtain healthy affordable food.” Yet the impact of food poverty stretches far beyond basic hunger. According to Sustain, food poverty means, “worse diet, worse access, worse health, higher percentage of income on food and less choice from a restricted range of foods. Above all food poverty is about less or almost no consumption of fruit & vegetables.”

Food Poverty in Bristol

The number of low income families in Bristol is higher than the national average. Whilst it is difficult to gauge the precise ratio of food poverty to low incomes, previous studies elsewhere have estimated that 20% of the population earning the UK national minimum wage or less are “food insecure”, with 6% “food insecure with hunger”. According to The Matthew Street Project, more than 69,000 people are income deprived in Bristol. Potentially, that’s a lot of people eating poorly, and far too many people not eating enough.

Optimised Energy Gets On Its Bike

Since 2009, FoodCycle has been making a difference, and Roy is playing his part in ensuring not only that more people in Bristol eat well, but that less food is wasted. The results benefit people and the environment. Since launch in 2009, FoodCycle has prevented 425,000kg of food from going to landfill and served 1,011,655 meals.

This story shows how Optimised Energy supports Goal 2: Zero Hunger, specifically Target 3.1: “By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round.”

About Optimised Energy

Optimised Energy is a full-service energy consulting business. They deliver energy cost and kilowatt hour savings for their clients through a ‘Managed Energy Services’ approach that combines best-of-breed hardware, software and service.

Learn more about Optimised Energy.

Ethical Brand Marketing helps business owners create and implement a marketing strategy to help them increase revenue and make more of a positive impact on the planet. Jessica Lohmann, the companies founder, has recently published a middle-grade book to show kids that they have the power and influence to change the world.

Profit and planet

Ethical Brand Marketing’s mission is to help brand owners and marketers create and implement an ethical marketing strategy that not only increases their revenue but also helps them save our environment and as many animals as humanly possible. Through their work with their partner B1G1, they have created a giving back strategy to help save and protect the environment.

B1G1

B1G1 is a social enterprise and non-profit organization with a mission to create a world full of giving. Unlike conventional giving models, B1G1 helps businesses achieve more social impact by embedding giving activities into everyday business operations and creating unique giving stories. Ethical Brand Marketing has embedded these ideas into the heart of their business by creating good from the small actions of their clients. In fact, even if you’ve only subscribed to their mailing list, you will have funded a day of rabies vaccinations for street dogs in Nepal.

Lily’s lessons

Ethical Brand Marketing believes that children can be taught to respect nature and animals through powerful storytelling. In 2019, they published Lily Bowers and The Uninvited Guest, the first of a middle-grade fantasy series to show the younger generation that they can save animals and change the world. Going that one step further, for every positive book review Ethical Brand Marketing will fund 1 literacy program for a girl in India via their B1G1 scheme.

This story shows how Ethical Brand Marketing supports Goal 4: Quality Education, specifically Target 4.7: “By 2030, ensure all learners acquire knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including among others through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship, and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development.”

About Ethical Brand Marketing

Founded in March 2018 by Jessica Lohmann, Ethical Brand Marketing’s mission is to help brand owners and marketers create and implement an ethical marketing strategy that not only increases their revenue but also helps them save the environment too.

Learn more about Ethical Brand Marketing.

Lulu Ileho Poultry Group’s mission is to eradicate poverty in Ileho, Kakamega county, Kenya by engaging women in income-generating agricultural activities so that they can become self-sufficient and productive.

Merry-go-round

Ileho Division is a rural area in western Kenya, on the eastern edge of the Kakamega Forest. The women in Ileho are traditionally dependent on their husbands’ incomes, most of which derive from agriculture. Taking the popular “merry-go-round” practice – where women meet at regular intervals to take turns in supporting each other – one step further, a group of women decided to take up income-generating activities to improve their livelihood and support their community.

Working women

Lulu Ileho Poultry Group’s main objective is to eradicate poverty in Ileho, Kakamega county, Kenya by engaging women in income-generating agricultural activities so that they can become self-sufficient and productive. They currently rear improved indigenous chicken and grow traditional vegetables for home consumption as well as for sale in a local market. Lulu Ileho also organises regular brainstorming sessions with other like-minded group leaders and representatives of successful village entrepreneurs to chart the way forward.

Fighting hunger

They aim to increase the agricultural knowledge of all the villagers and educate their members on the need to grow nutritious vegetables, and how to raise chicken for eggs and meat. Lulu Ileho Poultry Group also actively encourages its members to raise more than 100 chickens per household to improve cost efficiency. As a result of their programme, the women in the community have become significantly self-sufficient and less financially reliant on their husbands. In addition, as the women sell their products to the community to create income, the health of the whole community improves from an increase of fresh produce.

This story shows how Lulu Ileho Poultry Group supports Goal 2: Zero Hunger, specifically Target 2.1: “By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and the incomes of small-scale food producers, particularly women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment.

About Lulu Ileho Poultry Group

Founded in 2015, Lulu Ileho Poultry Group’s mission is to eradicate poverty among women, empower and promote healthy households through agriculture regardless of the beneficiaries religion. As such, their main objective is to eradicate poverty in Ileho, Kakamega county, Kenya by engaging women in income-generating agricultural activities so that they can become self-sufficient and productive.

Learn more about Lulu Ileho Poultry Group.

Taylor & Francis is an international company publishing books and academic journals. They have curated an online library to support the United Nations’ call to action to end poverty, fight inequality & injustice and protect the planet.


Sustainable Development Goals Online: Take a Tour from Taylor & Francis Books

Students

According to a global survey of recent university graduates, over 95% expect to be involved in sustainability in some way during their careers. In fact, the vast majority of those students also believe their university should teach them how to apply the principles of sustainability in their careers, equipping them to be effective advocates for the changes that they know needs to happen through their whole lifetime. Taylor & Francis is looking to these students to help build the next generation of leaders who have sustainable development hard-wired into their sensibilities with its latest launch of SDGO.

SDGO

Sustainable Development Goals Online (SDGO) from Taylor & Francis is a massive specialist online library of thousands of book chapters, journal articles, essays, videos and lesson plans. Created for institutional libraries, it covers all 17 of the UN Sustainable Development Goals and aims to engage many of the world’s 200 million higher education students, their tutors, and the researchers in their universities, in learning about, researching, and addressing what some are calling the ‘world’s biggest change programme’.

Curation

The collection was created in consultation with UN agencies and an international panel of research academics and professionals, and guided by an international Advisory Board of academics, practitioners, policy-makers, and many more. Jonas Haertle – from the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) – has stated: “To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals in the coming years, we need forward-thinking and responsible leadership, underpinned with education and research. The SDGO collection from Taylor & Francis is a significant contribution to that underpinning. Now more than ever we need to take action to ensure a truly sustainable future for all.”

This story shows how Taylor & Francis supports Goal 4: Quality Education, specifically Target 4.7: “By 2030, ensure all learners acquire knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including among others through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship, and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development.”

About Taylor & Francis

Founded in 1852, Taylor & Francis Group is an international company originating in England that publishes books and academic journals. Taylor & Francis publishes more than 2,700 journals, and about 7,000 new books each year, with a backlist of over 140,000 titles available in print and digital formats.

Learn more about Taylor & Francis.

Techbuyer is a global leader in the buying, refurbishing and selling of IT equipment. They have recently partnered with WindCOREs to provide refurbished hardware for an innovative project changing how data centres are powered.

Big data, big energy

Data centres are relatively new features on our landscape and many people are unaware they even exist, as they often occupy featureless industrial buildings. However, running data centres is a highly energy-intensive process. In fact, data centres currently use an estimated 200 terawatt-hours (TWh) of electricity per year – roughly 1% of the total global electricity demand and more than the energy consumption of some countries.

Winds of change

Techbuyer partnered with WindCOREs, an innovative IT hosting provider, on a project in Germany to site a data centre within the pillar of a wind turbine. As well as ensuring that IT equipment was powered by renewable energy, the project showed how a data centre can be located at the power source itself, removing the need for separate infrastructure. Techbuyer provided refurbished hardware for the project which, when combined with the savings on data infrastructure, provided a great example of making the most of existing assets.

Champions for the environment

The ER Excellence Awards recognise projects that embrace the latest in electrical engineering, display forward-thinking design and implementation, and champion the highest environmental, safety and energy efficiency standards. Techbuyer recently won the Sustainable Project of the Year at the Electrical Review Excellence Awards, for their project in partnership with WindCORES.

This story shows how Techbuyer supports Goal 7: Affordable and Clean Energy, specifically Target 7.2: “By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix.”

About Techbuyer

Techbuyer is a global leader in the buying, refurbishing and selling of enterprise IT equipment. Founded in 2005, Techbuyer has grown from a company run by just two people, to a global business with multiple warehouse facilities located worldwide.

Learn more about Techbuyer.

Skipton is the UK’s fourth-largest building society, with more than one million members and a national presence represented by its network of 88 branches. As part of its sustainability strategy, the building society has created an ‘eco-shop’ to raise employee awareness about responsible consumption and production.

A three planet future

To achieve economic growth and sustainable development we must urgently reduce our ecological footprint by changing the way we consume goods and resources. With the global population expected to reach 9.6 billion by 2050, the equivalent of almost three planets could be required to provide the natural resources needed to sustain our current lifestyles.

Big figures, small changes

Each year over 300 billion single-use cups are manufactured. Due to their plastic content, 99% will never be recycled. In addition, 4 billion trees are used in paper industries each year. These daunting figures often leave people feeling disheartened and questioning how can they can make a difference. Well, even small changes to your lifestyle, such as taking a reusable coffee cup to work, can have a huge effect in the long-term!

‘Eco-shop’

Skipton has provided an ‘eco-shop’ for employees to purchase environmentally friendly products for use at work and home. It includes a wide range of products including collapsable, re-usable coffee cups, lunch boxes, notebooks made from apple peel, water bottles, and more. In fact, to raise awareness about responsible consumption and production, all employees are given an initial GBP 5 voucher to spend in the ‘eco-shop’.

This story shows how Skipton Building Society supports Goal 12: Responsible Consumption and Production, specifically Target 12.2: “By 2030, achieve sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources achieve sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources.”

About Skipton Building Society

Skipton is the UK’s fourth-largest building society, with more than one million members and a national presence represented by its network of 88 branches. The Society was established in 1853 in Skipton, North Yorkshire, where it remains headquartered.

Learn more about Skipton Building Society.

Founded in 1963, Inditex is one of the world’s largest fashion retailers, with eight distinct brands from Zara to Pull&Bear to Breshka. They have invested in a host of social programmes to improve the quality of life of some of the most disadvantaged members of the world. In 2016, such programmes directly benefitted 1.1 million people.

Improving community welfare

At Inditex, they believe that their resources and activities can contribute to the development of societies across the world. Through aligning their community investment model with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), they have created an axis through which their commitment to the well-being of people and the community is carried out. Their commitments are often supported through regular collaborations with organizations such as Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), Water.org, and Cáritas.

One million

Inditex’s ground-breaking social programmes have had a significant positive effect on communities across the world. In 2016, Inditex’s investment in social programmes exceeded 40 million euros, 14% more than the previous year. In addition, the social programmes implemented during the year have directly benefited 1.1 million people globally.

Developing communities

The Bangladeshi community development programme works to improve living conditions in the most disadvantaged areas of Dhaka, it’s capital. They work in urban areas known as slums, where the vast majority of the population are in extreme poverty, to improve the quality of life and well-being in these areas. Inditex has created social institutions for underprivileged and unemployed women and established five childcare centres, which provide assistance in primary, maternal and reproductive health.

This story shows how Inditex supports Goal 1: No Poverty, specifically Target 1.4: “By 2030, ensure that all men and women, particularly the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership, and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology, and financial services including microfinance.”

About Inditex

Founded in 1963, Inditex is one of the world’s largest fashion retailers, with eight distinct brands. Headquartered in Arteixo, Spain, they sell in 202 markets through their online platform and 7,000 stores globally.

Learn more about Inditex and Caritas.

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